Text Summary - Functional Design Presentation At-Grade Section: Don Mills to Ionview

 

Crosstown Overview

The Crosstown is a $5.3 billion project funded by the Province of Ontario. It includes a 19 kilometre east-west Light Rail Transit (LRT) from Kennedy to Mt. Dennis, including a tunnelled central section, as well as new transit connections to the Yonge, University-Spadina Subway, Scarborough RT, GO Stouffville line and a future connection to the GO Kitchener line. The Crosstown will have up to 26 stations.

Where are we in the process?

  • The Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) launch shaft is approaching completion
  • Soil testing is currently underway from Don Mills Road to Weston Road
  • The west tunnel contract will be awarded this summer
  • Conceptual design and requirements identification are underway
  • What’s next?

  • Utility relocation at station locations beginning with Keele Street in winter 2013
  • Construction of the TBM launch and extraction shafts at Eglinton West station
  • TBMs arriving on site this spring
  • Tendering of project

Alternative Financing and Procurement (AFP)

The public-private partnership model has been underway in Canada for 20 years and has been used in 165 projects, including the Canada Line rapid transit project (Vancouver), Autoroute 25 in Montreal and the Trans-Canada highway in Atlantic Canada. In Ontario, AFP has been used for the Pan AM games athletes’ village, Ottawa Light Rail Transit, Highway 407 East Phase 1 and the Rt. Hon. Herb Gray Parkway (formerly the Windsor-Essex Parkway).

Owner’s Role Changes with AFP

Owner’s Role Changes with AFP

Advantages of AFP include:

  • Increased capacity to bring projects to market
  • Transfer of risk
    • Appropriate risks transferred to private sector to ensure “on time, on budget” delivery and offer value for money
    • Design, construction, cost escalation, schedule delays, operations, maintenance, life cycle and financial risk
  • Cost certainty
    • Optimal cost combination: combines capital, maintenance and life cycle costs
    • Integration of design and construction

Metrolinx's Roles and Responsibilities include

Design

  • Overall scope (inclusion of maintenance, operations, etc.)
  • Project-specific output specifications (in collaboration with consultant team)
  • Real estate acquisition (in collaboration with the City of Toronto)

Build

  • Oversee construction phase
  • Quality assurance

Finance

  • Manage project budget
  • With Infrastructure Ontario, run a competitive procurement process; select the winning contractor

Maintain

  • Testing & commissioning (in collaboration with the Toronto Transit Commission)
  • Safety certification and project acceptance
  • TTC to Operate
  • Integration with existing TTC system

Light Rail Vehicles vs. Buses

Light Rail Vehicles vs. Buses

Surface Light Rail Transit

Metrolinx LRV

The light rail vehicles (LRVs) will include four doors per car (two single and two double) and have up to three cars per consist (combination of individual cars).

LRT Vehicle

Light Rail Vehicles

LRT VehicleNew LRVs will feature:

  • 100% low floors, with level boarding at stops
  • Multiple-entries & Proof of Payment Fares for fast boarding
  • Air conditioning
  • Audio and visual passenger information
  • Manufactured in Thunder Bay, Ontario
  • High Passenger Capacity, 1 LRV =2.5 Buses

LRT Operations

  • Dedicated transit line for reliable service
  • Predictable travel times
  • Traffic Signal Coordination
  • Smooth & Comfortable
  • Wider stop spacing for fast service
  • Automated Fare Vending Machines
  • Next Vehicle Arrival Screens

Don Mills to Ionview

The 5.2 kilometre stretch between Don Mills and Ionview will contain nine stops and three Traction Power Sub Stations.

Illustration showing the nine stops between Don Mills and Ionview

Midblock

Midblock platform illustration

When the LRV is in operation, it will operate in a dedicated lane in the center of the road with two lanes of traffic and a bicycle lane on each side and in each direction.

Parallel Side Platforms

Parallel side platform illustration

At some locations LRT stops will be located parallel to each other on one side of the intersection. This is called parallel side platforms.

Far Side Platform

Far side platform illustration

At some locations LRT stops will be on opposite sides of the intersection. This is known as a far side platform.

Stop Configuration – Near Side

Stop configuration - near side illustration

A stop configuration – near side is when the LRT stop is located before the intersection.

Ferrand Stop

Context view: The above image illustrates a bird's eye view of the local land use surrounding the Ferrand stop.

Pedestrian flow view

Wynford Stop

Context view: The above image illustrates a bird's eye view of the local land use surrounding the Wynford stop.

Pedestrian flow view

Stop configuration view: The above images display the Wynford Stop as proposed in both the functional Design and as proposed in the environmental assessment.

Bermondsey Stop

Context view: The above image illustrates a bird's eye view of the local land use surrounding the Bermondsey stop.

Pedestrian flow view

Stop configuration view: The above images display the Bermondsey Stop as proposed in both the functional Design and as proposed in the environmental assessment.

Victoria Park Stop

Context view: The above image illustrates a bird's eye view of the local land use surrounding the Victoria Park stop.

Pedestrian flow view

Stop configuration view: The above images display the Victoria Park Stop as proposed in both the functional Design and as proposed in the environmental assessment.

Pharmacy Stop

Context view: The above image illustrates a bird's eye view of the local land use surrounding the Pharmacy stop.

Pedestrian flow view

Stop configuration view: The above images display the Pharmacy Stop as proposed in both the functional Design and as proposed in the environmental assessment.

Lebovic Stop

Context view: The above image illustrates a bird's eye view of the local land use surrounding the Lebovic stop.

Pedestrian flow view

Warden Stop

Context view: The above image illustrates a bird's eye view of the local land use surrounding the Warden stop.

Pedestrian flow view

Storage Track

  • At key sections along The Crosstown route additional tracks are needed to ensure vehicle storage and the ability to turn back
  • Storage tracks are required in case of unplanned equipment failure
  • Required approximately every 4km
  • Exact location under review

Birchmount Stop

Context view: The above image illustrates a bird's eye view of the local land use surrounding the Birchmount stop.

Pedestrian flow view

Stop configuration view: The above images display the Birchmount Stop as proposed in both the functional Design and as proposed in the environmental assessment.

Ionview Stop

Context view: The above image illustrates a bird's eye view of the local land use surrounding the Ionview stop.

Pedestrian flow view

Mid-block exits guided to traffic signals for Left Turns

Traction Power Substation

  • Traction power substations (TPSS) provide system power to light rail vehicles
  • They are planned with an average spacing of 1.5 km along surface sections
  • Integrated with adjacent landscape
  • Final locations still to be determined for:
    • Wynford
    • Jonesville/Victoria Park
    • Warden

Traffic Analysis

  • Detailed traffic analysis in progress
  • Locations where alternate traffic configurations are recommended:
    • Swift/Credit Union
    • Victoria Park
    • Pharmacy
  • Proposed solution in EA: Mid-block u-turn (Michigan left)
  • Final decision upon completion of traffic analysis

Surface Stop Design Elements

Design elements will:

  • Help riders recognize what stop they are at while visually distinguishing that they are riding the Crosstown line
  • Complement the common elements and strategies of the underground station section of the line

Pylon Signs

Pylon Signs will:

  • Provide immediate recognition of the Crosstown and create a lasting impression of stop locations
  • Lighting should be used to increase their presence at night

Patterned Platforms

  • The platform provides an opportunity to incorporate a distinctive pattern treatment
  • Slight variation from stop to stop will be considered
  • Extension of the pattern into the paving may also be included

Integrated Design

Design elements may be integrated into the stops through treatments such as:

  • Metalwork at guardrails and leaning rails
  • Design treatments on shelter glass

Lighting

  • Consistent and high quality lighting can enhance stop design.
  • Accenting the platform at night can enhance a feeling of safety and comfort.